Re-Thinking Mental Health

[Charles Smith | Contributing Writer]

The Ele-House crowd witnessed another laughter-filled comedy night to raise awareness for the UH Think Project.

The stand-up comedy night on 29th January was part of the UH Think Project’s scheme to help promote the awareness of mental health. This was the third stand-up comedy night to be held in the Ele-house, with many students turning out in support.

The comedian line-up consisted of Joel Stern, Parag Thaker, James Cantwell, Kamran Khan, Tom Rowe, Russ Haynes and Tunde Ghostt. With the ever increasing popularity of these events, the crowd were welcomed by full-time comedians, with one member of the audience, Jasmine Bush, “crying with laughter at one point.”

To accompany the comedians, there were musical performances from the soloist Natalie Davidson, who kicked things off with a lovely rendition of ‘Teenage Dirtbag’ which got the packed crowd involved. Post to her performance she said: “I didn’t know how it was going to go, but I’m glad people enjoyed it.”

The Two Blank Pages, a two-piece guitar group, were back to the comedy night for the third time with an exceptional performance we have become accustomed too. Finally, Nada ’bout U, a newly formed band, ended the night in style.

There was an air of positivity amidst the crowd. Inderpal Matharu, Aerospace Engineering student, said: “This was the funniest night of them all, I couldn’t stop smiling the whole way through.”

Most students were in support of the UH Think Project’s work and were pleased to see the growing success of the campaign.

Nathan Williams, Paramedic Science student, said, “Mental health is often stigmatised in today’s society as the ‘other’ disability, with statistics showing that every year one in four students suffer from some form of mental health issue. Events like this highlight that it is ok to speak about it.”

Mental Health is a prominent issue among students that needs to be brought to light, as it often goes unnoticed.  Paul Farmer, Chief Executive of Mind, says:

“More than 1 in 10 students surveyed, had experienced suicidal thoughts during the time they had spent at their current place of study. Despite the high prevalence of mental health problems and stress among students, many people are not seeking help, perhaps because of the stigma that can surround mental health problems.”

Imogen Stuart, the project leader of the UH Think Project said: “A simple way for it to become accepted as a part of our society is to show we accept it ourselves first. We have lots of events coming up… the more people involved, the more people will talk and the more they will be willing to listen.”

The work of the UH Think Project will continue throughout the calendar year. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) will be the focal issue for the month of February. According to the Mental Health Foundation PTSD affects 2.6% of men and 3.3% of women a year.

Dates for your diary:

  • On 18th February in accordance with the University Mental Health day, there will be an independent Sexual Violence advisor from Sunflower SARC, holding a talk on PTSD and their services between 2-3pm in Hutton Hall.
  • If you are keen to relive the success of the UH Stand-up, there is another opportunity to do so later on that evening.
  • On 24th February, why not head down to the forum for Krispy Kreme’ with all money going to Beat, The UK’s eating disorder charity.
  • On 25th there will time for find out more information regarding Mental Health with a talk from Mind regarding self Harm, it’s relation to PTSD, mental health well-being and protection, between 2-3pm in Hutton Hall.

Keep an eye out on Facebook, ‘UH Think Project’, and on Twitter @UHThink for more upcoming events.

 

Back
SHARE

Re-Thinking Mental Health