Grumpy Corner: body shaming

Image: Charlotte Mullin

[Hannah Bicknell | Features Editor]

Let’s talk body image. Yep, take a good look around and tell me what you don’t see. That’s right! You don’t see the ideal person, (arguably you could say that’s because it’s you and yes, in a way that’s true). As everyone is different, everyone is their own version of what they should be like. But society is built on a whole foundation of beliefs about how someone should look, eat, dress, speak, write etc., and thankfully it’s becoming a quickly outdated notion. People are starting to wake up and smell the cheeseburgers, and they are choosing not to conform to the range of crazy diets and health plans! Hooooray! But because everyone is so hardwired with the image of the seemingly perfect body, the habit of falling back into the ridiculous light shone on how you look (and how everyone around you looks) is all too easy. Instead of pushing a positive view on the benefits of being healthy, the media glorifies men and women at a size 0 – even if they’re unhealthy – and shames the ones that dare eat anything. Which frustratingly becomes ingrained in people, making them think they are better than everyone else, and some aren’t afraid to let others know it.

The whole thing irritates me more than I could ever express here; especially when I hear stories about a collective group of people, targeting seemingly overweight strangers and handing them cards to tell them they are worst of humanity. Something has got to be said of the sheer hypocrisy that follows one of those cards, but I’ve heard arguments that agree with the card giving. The question I want to put out there is when did everyone decide what is good for everyone else? At what point did someone decide the girl sitting across from me was too wide, or too thin or too freaking tall, and deserved to be abused accordingly? Because that’s what it is at the end of the day. These people are abusing someone verbally and though they may not leave any physical scars, the mental ones will stay with that person for the rest of their life. It could be the cause of a drastic (either good or bad) change in their life. But, nine times out of ten, and speaking from experience, it is very rare that spewing words of disdain will make a positive impact on a person.

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Grumpy Corner: body shaming